George Braque\'s retrospective at Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

 

Alongside Picasso and Juan Gris formed the Holy Triad of Cubism and some people said that, even more than the painter of Málaga, George Braque was the real father of cubist art of the twentieth century. Now, on the 50th anniversary of his death, the Guggenheim Museum of Bilbao has organized the most ambitious Braque's retrospective with loans from the Pompidou and some of the best collections in the world. 
He inherited the classical tradition of landscape and still life and led by the paths of abstraction and cubism as few artists have achieved. George Braque (Argenteuil Sur Seine, Paris 1882-1963), founder of the collage (then called "papier collés" pasted papers) that it liked so much to the Parisian avant-garde and in particular to his colleagues Pablo Picasso and Juan Gris, Braque represented the French painter by excellence with a long and fruitful production. He also encompassed many facets always from the research, analysis and study sedate (poetry, music, scenery, engraved ...) and walked away voluntarily from the image of the bohemians, drunken artists that was fashionable in time. 
 
Now his entire career, from his Fauve period, Cubism and his first encounter with Picasso in 1907, his later paintings, his series, all his work arrives to Bilbao through 250 works in the largest retrospective held in Spain on the French artist. 
Curated by Brigitte Leal, the exhibition "George Braque" pays tribute to one of the leading figures of the avant-garde of the early twentieth century, though, as Leal explained, not always was recognized: "The status of official artist of the Gaullisme undoubtedly clouded the eyes of the rebellious generation that followed him".
 
"Picasso is the best known name of the twentieth century," added the curator, "Braque was very much loner".
 

Until 21 September, at the Guggenheim in Bilbao, in addition, you can see the unpublished Braque's pottery coming from a private collection and that shows his fascination with classical style and Greek pottery. A must see is the unfinished painting "The weeder" that Braque left in his easel in 1963 and that ends the tour of the exhibition.

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.