The lines of destiny of Marina Vargas

 

 

A thin invisible line connects in the space-time a run of Tarot cards, two ceramic vases of Alcora from eighteenth century and a cover of the magazine Blanco y Negro dated 1930. The artist who has drawn that golden line is Marina Vargas (Granada, 1980).

 

As the protagonist of the program Connections in its eleventh edition, Vargas submitted a proposal which connect two works: one from the Collection of the Banco Santander Foundation and other from the funds of the ABC Museum. In this case the vases and the cover (by the way, by Angels Torner Cervera, one of the pioneer women of Spanish graphic design) were integrated into the exhibition "Lines of Destiny" through a third element, a deck of Tarot de Marseille. The magic was served.
 

 

Marina Vargas was inspired by a real Tarot reading (a video can also be enjoyed in the sample) and she has reinterpreted the 9 cards that came out that way and marked her destiny. Her version of the arcana is marked by her arabesques, her lines, the "guts" that fill the original drawing and fill it with mythology, symbols and traditional beliefs, witchcraft and Santeria, mixed with language more cultured art .

 

 

Some of the 9 pieces, enlarged and placed on wooden supports, are deliberately taken down and they rest on the floor because the artist wanted to finish them in situ so that the viewer can also enjoy the creative process and the transformation of the works.

 

 

The Connections program offers mid-career artists the opportunity to present a broad sample in a not galleristic institutional space, and invites them to show projects based on the drawing as a basic format and inspired by works from the Museum's collections and the foundation.

"Lines of Destiny" will be in the ABC Museum of Illustration (Madrid) until 25 September 2016.
 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.