The Revolution of Marcel Dzama

Marcel Dzama, “Welcome to the land of the drone”, 2011.

 

 

La Casa Encendida dedicates to this exhibition three showrooms where the artworks are displayed according to their technique and subject-matter. Though Dzama is a multidisciplinary creator that has recently enlarged his field of experimentation up to include sculpture or video, he has always stood out as a great drawing-maker. His artworks were used several times to illustrate the covers of music albums such as They Might Be Giants, Beck, and The Weakerthans. In this occasion, the exhibition comprises a representative sample of drawings, watercolours and inks, to which the major part of the space is devoted; but it also incorporates sculptures and a video projection. All these pieces together allow to better know the career of this author and going deeper into the setting of his creative universe.

 

 

Marcel Dzama, “Daily lady daily mail”, 2016.

 

 

Dzama was born in Winnipeg, Canada, although he currently works and lives in New York, where he made the majority of his solo exhibitions. He has been compared to the outsider artist Henry Darger, due to the similarity between both of them in the illustration artworks. However, Dzama feeds himself of various trends, like the Dadaism, the Surrealism or the Soviet agitprop to inspire his projects.

 

 

Marcel Dzama, “My mother, my father, my sister, my killer, my lover, my savior, and other faces I once knew”.

 

 

The title of the exhibition refers to the line of work that Dzama has been following more recently, where the influence of the Soviet aesthetics is clear. The illustrations remember the classical compositions of the propaganda posters, with the addition of elements linked to the revolutionary spirit: characters holding weapons wearing army uniforms and the recourse to softer colours.

The exhibition opens the 28th of September and will be on show until next January.
 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.