The exhibition \'All Yesterday\'s Parties. Andy Warhol, music and vinyls (1949/1987)\' depicts the role threat the work of Andy Warhol played in music.

 

 

Even though album cover design has long been considered a secondary form of art, in Andy Warhol's case his relationship with rock bands, with their sound and way of life, were primary aspects in the development of his work in particular and pop art in general.

 

Curated by F. Javier Panera, the exhibition 'All Yesterday's Parties. Andy Warhol, music and vinyls (1949/1987)' traces a genealogy of the relationships between art and popular culture in the second half of the 20th century through more than 200 items, including album covers, books, magazines, posters, photographs, prints, drawings, films, video/installations, song videos and several objects and documents related to the artistic universe of Warhol for more than four decades.


 

 

 

Between 1949 and 1987, Warhol signed more than 60 covers of records of -among others- The Velvet Underground, John Lennon, Aretha Franklin or Debbie Harry. But he also used music as a thematic axis of his work, contributing an iconography, muses (his portraits of popover and rock stars like Mick Jagger, Diana Ross or Debbie Harry are memmorable) and concepts (like serial printing and the appropriation John Cage did for his works).

 

Andy Warhol directed and produced videos for bands like The Cars or Curiosity Killed The Cat, and even shot a program for MTV. All these works can be now enjoyed at the Room 3 of the Contemporay Art Museum of Castilla y León.

 

 

        

 

 

Andy Warhol is part of the first generation of artists whoeducated themselves from their youth on by listening to pop and rock music, and, through his work, ' one could write a history of the musical tastes of the United States from post/war to the last years of the 80s, from classical music to opera and ballet, and through jazz, minimalism, experimental music, rock, pop, soul, disco music, punk or the new wave'.

 

 

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.