Frieze London 13th edition

 

 

 

It is the largest and most spectacular art fair in Britain and this year offers real bargains, works by emerging artists from 1,000 pounds, a novelty at the fair which usual prices are not less than 20,000 pounds.

 

"Unrivaled in quality, variety and depth," as they say in their press presentation, Frieze shows its strength and expertise in contemporary art with the work of a team led by some of the most important curators on the international scene: Nicola Lees (Commissioner of the 31th Biennial of Graphic Arts, Ljubljana), Clare Lilley (Director of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park Programme) and Gregor Muir (Executive Director of ICA, London) who run the various programs and sections of the fair.

 

 

 

 


In this thirteenth edition FRIEZE it has 164 galleries from 27 countries that present the work of some of the most important contemporary artists of today. The mythical giant tent in Regent's Park hopes to give art and emotions to 60,000 visitors, collectors, critics, curators and art lovers that usually comes to this event. The pressure for curators and galleries is great, to stand out in Frieze is an arduous task.

 

 

 

 

Therefore there are bright proposals as the booth that reproduces the environment of a psychiatric hospital inspired in Jean Dubuffet ... or definitive sculptures as Ai Weiwei's "Iron Root" of the Lisson Gallery with secret price.

 

 

"There is much noise around Frieze so the curators try to do something that excites us and excites the artist hoping that it can attract to the audience," says the head of the gallery Hauser & Wirth. "It's not only to bring works or to work with a young fashion artist. You have to be smart and do a good job on your booth, knowing you have little ability to attract attention for the amount on offer there. We try to make a difference, raise the bar a little, "he adds.

 

 

Obra de Ignasi Aballí para Elba Benítez en FRIEZE LONDON 2015.

 

Participant galleries:


303 Gallery, New York
Galería Juana de Aizpuru, Madrid
The Approach, London
Laura Bartlett Gallery, London
Galería Elba Benítez, Madrid
Blum & Poe, Los Angeles
Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York
Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York
The Box, Los Angeles
The Breeder, Athens
Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York
Buchholz, Berlin
Cabinet, London
Campoli Presti, London
Canada, New York
Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne
Casas Riegner, Bogotá
Cheim & Read, New York
Sadie Coles HQ, London
Contemporary Fine Arts, Berlin
Pilar Corrias Gallery, London
Corvi-Mora, London
Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris
Thomas Dane Gallery, London
Massimo De Carlo, Milan
dépendance, Brussels
Galerie Eigen + Art, Berlin
Foksal Gallery Foundation, Warsaw
Galeria Fortes Vilaça, São Paulo
Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles
Carl Freedman Gallery, London
Stephen Friedman Gallery, London
Frith Street Gallery, London
Gagosian Gallery, London
Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam
A Gentil Carioca, Rio de Janeiro
Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg
Marian Goodman Gallery, London
Greene Naftali, New York
greengrassi, London
Galerie Karin Guenther, Hamburg
Bruce Haines, Mayfair, London
Hauser & Wirth, London
Herald St, London
Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin
Hollybush Gardens, London
Gallery Hyundai, Seoul
Ibid., London
Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo
Alison Jacques Gallery, London
Galerie Martin Janda, Vienna
Johnen Galerie, Berlin
Casey Kaplan, New York
Georg Kargl Fine Arts, Vienna
Anton Kern Gallery, New York
Galerie Peter Kilchmann, Zurich
Tina Kim Gallery, New York
König Gallery, Berlin
David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles
Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York
Galerie Krinzinger, Vienna
Kukje Gallery, Seoul
kurimanzutto, Mexico City
Simon Lee Gallery, London
Lehmann Maupin, New York
Galleria Lia Rumma, Milan
Lisson Gallery, London
Kate MacGarry, London
Mai 36 Galerie/Victor Gisler, Zurich
Maisterravalbuena, Madrid
Mary Mary, Glasgow
Galerie Greta Meert, Brussels
Mendes Wood DM, São Paulo
Galerie Kamel Mennour, Paris
Galerie Meyer Kainer, Vienna
Victoria Miro, London
Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London
The Modern Institute, Glasgow
MOT International, London
mother’s tankstation, Dublin
Taro Nasu, Tokyo
Galerie Nordenhake, Berlin
Galleria Lorcan O’Neill, Rome
Office Baroque, Brussels
P.P.O.W, New York
Pace, London
Maureen Paley, London
Peres Projects, Berlin
Galerie Perrotin, Paris
Galeria Plan B, Berlin
Galerija Gregor Podnar, Berlin
Project 88, Mumbai
Rampa, Istanbul
Galleria Raucci/Santamaria, Naples
Almine Rech Gallery, London
Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London
Rodeo, London
Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Paris
Salon 94, New York
Esther Schipper, Berlin
Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Munich
Sfeir-Semler, Beirut
Shanghart Gallery, Shanghai
Sommer Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv
Sprüth Magers, Berlin
Standard (Oslo), Oslo
Stevenson, Cape Town
Galeria Luisa Strina, São Paulo
Supportico Lopez, Berlin
T293, Rome
Take Ninagawa, Tokyo
Timothy Taylor, London
The Third Line, Dubai
Vermelho, São Paulo
Vilma Gold, London
Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou
Michael Werner, New York
White Cube, London
Wien Lukatsch, Berlin
Wilkinson, London
Zeno X Gallery, Antwerp
David Zwirner, London
Focus Program
47 Canal, New York
Antenna Space, Shanghai
Bureau, New York
Callicoon Fine Arts, New York
Carlos/Ishikawa, London
Clearing, New York
Croy Nielsen, Berlin
Experimenter, Kolkata
Fonti, Naples
Freedman Fitzpatrick, Los Angeles
Freymond-Guth Fine Arts, Zurich
François Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles
Grey Noise, Dubai
Dan Gunn, Berlin
High Art, Paris
Hopkinson Mossman, Auckland
Jan Kaps, Cologne
Koppe Astner, Glasgow
Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna
Limoncello, London
Galeria Jaqueline Martins, São Paulo
Misako & Rosen, Tokyo
Múrias Centeno, Lisbon
Night Gallery, Los Angeles
Simon Preston Gallery, New York
Project Native Informant, London
Dawid Radziszewski, Warsaw
Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco
Société, Berlin
Gregor Staiger, Zurich
Stereo, Warsaw
Simone Subal Gallery, New York
Sultana, Paris
The Sunday Painter, London
Rob Tufnell, London
Leo Xu Projects, Shanghai
Live Program (performances and live shows)
Arcadia Missa, London Amalia Ulman
Luhring Augustine, New York / Franco Noero, Turin Tunga
Meyer Riegger, Berlin Eva Ko?átková
Misako & Rosen, Tokyo Ken Kagami
Southard Reid, London Edward Thomasson & Lucy Beech
Kate Werble Gallery, New York Rancourt / Yatsuk

Buying the first work of art always instils respect. A difficult feeling to define that mixes vertigo with adrenaline. But over uncertainty and caution, a pleasurable sense of connection, understanding, and desire prevails. That work that, once seen, stays in the mind, reappears in the memory several times a day and seems to tell you that it is willing to be part of your home, is the perfect candidate to make the decision.

In the first steps, many collectors do point out that one does not start from an established plan, but rather that one acquires pieces based on taste and the connection one feels with them until, after time, they realise that the volume of works that accumulates can be labelled as a "collection". For example, this is how Alicia Aza explains it:

“I was not aware that I was collecting until many years later when a third party named me as a collector and talked about my collection. In 2005, I became aware of what collecting means and decided to articulate a collection with an identity of criteria and formats”.

Marcos Martín Blanco, co-founder, with his wife Elena Rueda, of the MER Collection, shares this same opinion:

“Collecting has been a passion, driven by a visceral state that encourages you to do so. The collection, in terms of acquisitions, has not been particularly complicated because, let's face it: it is easy to buy because they are all beautiful things and you have some clear idea of where you want to go, but at first those preferences were not so clear. It is with the time that a criterion is being formed”.

It is not always this way, of course, but for the buyer who starts out on this path, the personal connection that entails the first piece is essential. There it is the germ of a lasting relationship that is not limited to a simple aesthetic question but is an open window to knowledge, to exploration, to a world that is often unknown to us and awakens our fascination. The seed of that connection is purely sentimental, and it is precisely this impulse that determines the first acquisitions. The first piece is never forgotten.

Art Madrid'20, photo by Ana Maqueda

Exceeding the usual recommendations made by advisers and agents, rare is the occasion when the art lover decides to buy by pure investment. These paths usually open later, when the volume of pieces is large enough. In addition, there are those who are a bit against this classic concept of the traditional collector, approached from an eccentric, elitist and little accessible vision. On the contrary, art buyers are, above all, art lovers, sentient beings and permeable to creative stimulus who, at a given moment, decide to deepen the relationship they already have with art to take a piece home.

It is not that hard to overcome that small psychological barrier that turns the visitor into a buyer if one approaches the matter from a more personal and intimate perspective than from social consideration. Small-format works, graphic work or serial photography are of great help for this, whose price range, generally more affordable, allows a closer comparison to the daily basis expenses. In this way, the purchase of art falls within the range of feasible activities and becomes something close and possible.

Art Madrid'20, photo by Marc Cisneros

At that moment, a different relationship with art begins, based on pure experience and coexistence with the acquired piece. Perhaps it can be seen as an act of daring, but on many occasions, it is more a matter of necessity and transformation. Collectors also agree that the acquisition of an artwork is an exercise on personal analysis and opening up to a new field of knowledge that was previously alien to us. Alicia Aza explains that the reason she acquired her first piece of video art, by Sergio Prego, is because she did not understand it and because she saw it as a challenge and an opportunity to self-improve. This open window to knowledge creates new connections and bonds with creators, as one of the most fascinating parts of the process. Candela Álvarez Soldevilla explains that

"I think the most interesting thing in the art world is talking to artists. They are people with a special sensitivity to listen and understand.”

And Alicia Aza also says:

"I can share the satisfaction of being able to count on many artists in my circle of close friends today, and that is a long way to go."

Thus, with works that seem acceptable within the horizon of expenses that each one considers affordable, it is easy to find a piece that catches us. Since then, our home also evolves into a space in which art has a permanent place and presence, and there is no doubt that this transforms us inside.

Art Madrid'20, photo by Henar Herguera

Jaime Sordo, owner of Los Bragales collection and founder of the 9915 Contemporary Art Collectors Association, has always defined his relationship with art as a true passion and a vital necessity. For buyers who start on this path, he has the following recommendation:

“It is an essential condition that they feel the need to live with their passion to enjoy the works. Another very important aspect is that before making decisions for purchases, they are informed, so it is necessary to read specialised newspapers and books, visit exhibitions and museums and a lot of contact with galleries, which is an important and very specific source of information of the artists they represent. Finally, the presence in national and international art fairs. All this generates information and training.”

Indeed, fairs have become a good place for discovery because they condense a wide offer and allow diverse and global contact in a concentrated way. For this reason, many new generation buyers start in the context of an event such as Art Madrid, whose closeness and quality constitute a unique opportunity to meet, soak up and feed the passion for art.

(*) quotes taken from various interviews published in public media between 2013 and 2019.