From Divisionism to Futurism in Fundación Mapfre.

 

 

 

Until 5 June, the Mapfre Foundation give us the opportunity to know a little more about a crucial time in the history of Italy, from the late nineteenth century to the early twentieth, when the political, economic and social situation in the country suffered a deep crisis that largely determined their concept of nation facing the nearby World War. Likewise, artists imbibed the prevailing reality and made with his works a tribute to his people, to their hardships, and many of them with an intense political life.

 

 

 

 

The exhibition 'From Divisionism to Futurism. Italian art to modernity ', organized in collaboration with the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art of Trento and Rovereto, includes 78 pictures in 5 sections, and discusses how Italian painters find a style that flows naturally in the vanguards of the twentieth century. Futurism and divisionism thus define the birth of modern Italian painting.

 

 

 

 

In a first time, artists are profoundly influenced by impressionism and pointillism, but they evolved the style by the descomposition of the paint in 3 primary colors creating a vibrant unsurpassed effect. Divisionism was borned. Their themes reflect natural landscapes and popular scenes (dances, maternities ...) until they begin to notice the cities and the social inequalities, the idea of ??transformation and future.

 

 

The outbreak of the workers' struggle and social protest in the Italian economic capital acts as a shock to many artists who are impelled to spearhead the revolution. A success case was Futurism, which emerged around Marinetti's manifesto in which he inviting the break, violence and industrialization as the solution of all problems on the eve of the Great War. Among the artists who joined this movement were Boccioni, Carra and Balla.
 

 

 

 

The movement, speed, light and color were symbols of modern life and this momentum strengthened the idea of a ??young, strong and united nation. Futurism, one of the leading avant-garde beginning of the twentieth century, would lead to a purely abstract and contemporary aesthetic without ever forgetting his membership in the representation of light and color.

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.