Futurism exhibition NY

 

The Guggenheim museum in New York traces the history of Futurism with an exhibition of over 300 pieces of the main leaders of the Italian avant-garde movement: “Italian Futurism (1909-1944 ). Reconstruction of the Universe” can be visited until September, 2014 .

It is not very common that such a loud, aggressive and revolutionary movement has received so little attention inside and outside its geographical borders... Futurism, the most violent trend of the avant-gardes of the early twentieth century was born in Italy with the rabid desire to create a new world, machining and bright away from classicism, classical art and the Academy, and based its manifesto on the literal "burning" of museums and cultural institutions in their own country and the glorification of war and violence as the only way for growth Art and society.

"A roaring car that seems to run on a trail of shrapnel is more beautiful than the Victory of Samothrace". With tremendous force Le Futurisme portrayed the environment of the Europe of the early twentieth century, an environment on political, philosophical, religious and scientific chances. According to futurists "the triumphant progress of science makes inevitable the profound changes in humanity".

Filippo Tomasso Marinetti, a poet born in Egypt and educated in Paris into an intellectual family, did not hesitate to choose the cover of Le Figaro, the most read newspaper in France , home of the Avant-Garde, to present his ideas. He knew that these Saturday 20 of February, 1909 would raise blisters.

"It is from Italy that we launch this new manifest to the world, because we want to free this country from its fetid gangrene of professors, archaeologists, and antiquarians. Too much time has been this country a place for secondhand-dealers. We want to liberate Italy from the innumerable museums that cover all around with cemeteries".

The exaltation of a renewed Italy impacted to young Italian artists like Boccioni, Giacomo Balla, Gino Severini, Carlo Carrà, Luigi Russolo,… who poured into large canvases their studies of motion, speed, industrial landscapes, smoking chimneys and locomotives, revolutionary masses, electrical cables and airplanes "whose propeller spreads flames in the wind like a flag and seems cheering over the enthusiastic mass" as says the manifesto.

Inevitably, an artistic and nationalist movement of these features drove itself at breakneck-speed toward politics and soon agreed with the thesis of the Fascists. Marinetti joined the Fascist Party in 1919 and showed loyalty to Mussolini until his dead. In one of his points, the Futurism Manifesto ensured "we glorify war, only hygiene of the world". And it was the war, the First World War, who ended the movement. Most of its members and supporters died faithful to his ideas or dissapeared into Europe during this chaotic time.

His main legacy, in addition to the excitement, was the representation of speed, to "bear with static media, the real movement", knowledge that defined, for example, the development of the comic.

Now, this movement lands in the Guggenheim Museum in New York with the strength of more than 360 works by 80 artists. “Italian Futurism (1909-1944). Reconstruction of the Universe” is probably the biggest exhibition about Futurism of all times.

 

Rodrigo Juarranz, founded in Aranda de Duero in 2006 under the slogan "Art within everyone's reach", has focused its exhibition activity on supporting the most recent art, promoting exhibition projects by artists with innovative trends belonging to both the national and international sphere. Juarranz is committed to both established and emerging artists, as long as their work pursues innovation within contemporary art, both from a thematic and technical point of view.

In this edition of Art Madrid, the gallery presents the work of six contemporary artists who stand out for their multi-disciplinary nature. Amélie Ducommun, Beatriz Díaz Ceballos, Diego Benéitez, Jaime Sicilia, Jorge Marín and Marcos Tamargo, are the artists who will be exhibiting at Rodrigo Juarranz's booth.

Marcos Tamargo

De la tierra al cielo, 2019

Oil on board

180 x 180cm

Marcos Tamargo (Gijón, Asturias, 1982), the flagship artist of Rodrigo Juarranz Gallery, develops his artistic activity between the United States and Europe. A great connoisseur of conventional techniques, he has been the creator of an innovative procedure, which the author himself has designated as "Move-Art". It consists of generating on the same support two different works, one will be perceived by the spectator in a conventional way, while the other will be visible only with black light. His recent series of portraits dedicated to women who have been awarded the Nobel Prize throughout history and those who will receive it in the future have been developed with this technique. Marie Sklodowska-Curie was the first woman portrayed in this series.

The Asturian artist had already experimented with this technique in his series of portraits of the Princess of Asturias Awards, which he began in 2011, portraying among others Leonard Cohen or Haile Gebrselaise. In 2012 he portrayed architect Rafael Moneo and footballers Iker Casillas and Xabi Hernández.

Rodrigo Juarranz is the only gallery that represents in Spain the Mexican Jorge Marín, an artist that during his career has developed a figurative work that is catalogued among the most important of the contemporary art in Mexico. In his search for identity, and after experimenting with multiple disciplines and materials, Jorge Marín opts for bronze and from there on, all his work is configured under this noble and traditional material that allows him to generate in his pieces an extremely mimetic appearance to the elements of the living matter he represents. His formats oscillate between miniature and monumentality, the latter taking over public spaces, in which he establishes a conversation with the spectator which art, as he himself confesses, "is an indispensable tool for generating more reflexive and peaceful societies".

Amélie Ducommun

Caja 1, 2019

Mixta sobre papel

26 x 26cm

Amélie Ducommun (Barcelona, 1983) presents her delicate art boxes. Amélie represents nature in her works by means of a textured line of colour where she composes the landscape and the natural elements that are interrelated in it. All this from the questionable perspective of memory. Some representations are placed on the surface of the boxes, which in turn serve as a monstrance, in the manner of archives that endure.

Beatriz Díaz Ceballos (Oviedo, 1971), delights us in this fair with a proposal in which literature materialises in three-dimensional plastic works, where the book goes from being the literary support to becoming a material component of merely plastic art. The books vomit words and are transformed into sculptural forms of great beauty or generate forests that emerge from their imaginary interior. The letters are materialized by means of copper micro-fusions in which they acquire the nature of original sculptures that generate beautiful visual poems.

Beatriz Díaz Ceballos

Torre I, 2015

Mixed media

15 x 26cm

Diego Benéitez (Zamora, 1986), began his exhibition career a decade ago and is one of the artists that Rodrigo has trusted, since years ago, to present his latest creations in Art Madrid. The artist from Zamora, executes in his works a compendium between the figuration and the abstraction, capturing in his tables covered by one of the most traditional techniques of the painting, the oil, some subtle landscapes in which the simplicity of the symbols that form it, being reduced sometimes to the horizontality of the application of the colour, manage to contribute to the work a solemnity so vehement that it makes us submerge in them.

The interdisciplinary artist Jaime sicilia (Madrid, 1970), works between media as varied as painting, sculpture, photography or video. Sicily participates with his series "Waldweben", where we can see the variety and confluence of materials and techniques that he uses in his works. Acrylics, pigments and photographic emulsions are displayed on wooden, metal or plastic supports to create a subtle reality that takes us into the mysterious Wagner forest.

Diego Benéitez

El recuerdo que despierta, 2019

Oil on board

120 x 120cm

Jaime Sicilia

Waldweben 09, 2019

13 Broken Blatt and metal and plastic support

140 x 140cm