Klimt/Schiele/Kokoschka and their women at the Belvedere Vienna

Mujer sentada con medias violeta, de Egon Schiele.

 

 

 

In the early years of the twentieth century, sexuality and their roles they changed forever. Equality between men and women, sexual openness, family relationships, reproductive issues... the moral imperatives of the nineteenth century entered were questioned, and new models transforming female identity were borned.

 

 

 

                

Desnudo, de Oscar Kokoschka y Eugenia (Mada) Primavesi, de Klimt.

 

 

At that time, in Vienna, the bourgeoisie opened to sexuality, they read Freud and Otto Weininger and discovered in art a channel for the representation of female sexuality. Now, the Belvedere Museum in Vienna looks back to that revolution through the eyes of three revolutionary artists: Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), Egon Schiele (1890-1918) and Oskar Kokoschka (1886-1980), three masters who contributed their fantasies and portraits to the consolidation and assumption of new female roles, ladies, villains, nymphs, sexual and sensual women, mothers, daughters, maids, libertines ...

 

 

 

El Abrazo (Pareja de enamorados II), de Egon Schiele.

 

"The imprint of Klimt as man and artist has its origin at this time," the curator and deputy director of the Viennese museum Alfred Weidinger  "Klimt moved between these areas and his art reacted to the discussion at that time about "the mystery of the woman. '" For the exhibition, which brings together more than 150 pieces (50 of each author coming from collections worldwide), the curator and New York gallerist Jane Kallir, has established four themes: the portrait, the couple (romantic), mother and the child, and the nude. The flashy, bright and golden Klimt portraits they contrast with the lonely expression, and the abandoned and silent faces and bodies from Kokoschka, but especially with the raw, naked skinny, women from Schiele, more provocative and exhibitionistic. But what also shines through this exhibition, it is the commonalities of the three, and the most obvious: the three believed in romantic love.

 

 

Retrato de Elisabeth Reitler, de Kokoschka.

 

 

Klimt/Schiele/Kokoschka y las mujeres.
Del 22/10/2015-28/02/2016
Belvedere Inferior, Orangerie (Belvedere - Unteres Belvedere & Orangerie)

 

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.