LISTEN WITH YOUR EYES. SOUNDS ART IN SPAIN, 1961-2016

Ramón González-Arroyo, L'isla des Neumas, 2007. Sound installation at the Fundación Juan March Museum, Palma. Collection of the artist. Photo: Xisco Bonnín / Fundación Juan March Archive

 

 

The face B of contemporary art is noted with the compilation sample of Sound art of the foundation Juan March (Madrid), this set was already exhibited in the Juan March Foundation Museum of Palma de Mallorca (February 10 - May 21) and In the Museum of Spanish Abstract Art of Cuenca (June 16 - September 18). These artistic practices have been gaining support through exhibitions in museums and monographic exhibitions, as well as their presence in reasoned catalogs and the elaboration of specialized bibliography.

 

The curators, José Iges and José Luis Maire have chosen more than 400 works to articulate this particular discourse. As a blank sheet, sound art up to the 60s had no place in the Spanish artistic panorama and even until the 70s was not found the relevant documentation to catalog it as artistic practice. In this exhibition, they give a nod to the story that has not been resorted to and give it the importance it deserves.

 

 

 

Photo of the exhibition

 

 

The characteristic of such exposure is the homogeneity with which it has been treated. The most common when projecting an exhibition of these characteristics is to isolate each work of the group to endow it with a unitary meaning and not contaminate the acoustic space. That sense of exclusivity and evasion has been shaped in "Listening with the eyes". Here they have preferred that these works share space with those of the permanent collection and have articulated a discourse that not only highlights our auditory sense, but also the visual one. This action gives the static work a certain dynamism that makes its reading can be interpreted with another language.

 

Photo of the exhibition

 

 

They have also taken into account the architectural structure of the spaces, thus integrating works that endow the space with a significant character that only the audiovisual can foster. The view is a very powerful sense and with this sample aims to give voice to what the eye is not accustomed, form a binomial and break the limits of space.


Technological obsolescence and collective memory are very definite themes in the character of the show, this anachronistic challenge, has been articulated in a chronological way, beginning with the pioneer artists of the 60s, vinyls as standard of the Sound Art. There are not only samples In the exhibition of Madrid, have integrated with these pieces files and objects relating to the pieces creating a signed statement of the trajectory of said practice.
 

 

 

Mikel Arce, * .WAV, 2004. Sound installation at the Juan March Foundation Museum, Palma. Collection of the artist. Photo: Xisco Bonnín / Fundación Juan March Archive

 

 


Until the 21 of January you can visit her in the Foundation March, Madrid. An obligatory stop for all those who love the sensory and the eccentric. An appointment with what has never been forgotten and now is being given voice. If you are looking for an alternative to what is stipulated this is your exhibition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.