Lillian Bassman Pinceladas exhibitioon Loewe Foundation Madrid

The photographer Lillian Bassman revolutionized the world of fashion photography adding the sense and sensitivity of femininity in her images. Now, the Loewe Foundation honors this charismatic woman.
"My contribution has been photograph the world of women's fashion with the feelings of a woman seen through the eyes of another woman". Lillian Bassman, self-demanding, rigorous and wildly creative, had clear that her work should not go unnoticed and, with the same discipline that she was dedicated to painting and dance, she flipped on giving uniqueness and elegance to your pictures. 
 
The "Pinceladas" exhibition, shows for the first time in Spain the work of this American artist of Jewish origin that transformed fashion photography giving it shades of paint and developing treatments - long before the invention of Photoshop - to reveal not only an image, a moment or a style, but also feelings and sensations. "I was interested in creating a vision that went beyond what the camera saw," said Bassman... And it seems she made it.
Bassman lived a great time in the Art Department of Harper's Bazaar, from where she filled fashion magazines with the sophisticated females of the Happy 30's, after the Second World War. From that time, for example, you can see the legendary photograph "Across the Restaurant. Paris 1949". 
 
But the years passed and the happy world of fashion and advertising also changed. In the 70s, the photographer, disappointed by the direction its sector took and in which "there was no room for experimentation", made a radical turn in his career and destroyed many of his films. Luckily, his aides hid some of the material and, as a result, Lillian Bassman was rediscovered in the 90s, already turned 80. Bassman returned with renewed strength and experimented with acids, tissue paper, smoked lenses...
After a successful exhibition in New York in 1993, she received orders from major firms and trendy journals, and. in 2004, the work of Lillian Bassman was awarded with the Lucie Award for his unquestionable and unique contribution to fashion photography in the forties and fifties. 
 
A few months before his death, at ninety-four, Bassman was working on your pictures through the computer: "Here I am, it is not the lab but experimenting with the computer it's also fun."
 
Curated by Maria Millan, the exhibition is framed in PhotoEspaña 2014 program and you can enjoy it at Loewe Foundation (Serrano, 26 Madrid) until 31 August. Then, it will travel to the headquarters of the Foundation in Barcelona until 9 November.

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.