Louise Bourgeois in Picasso\'s Malaga Museum

Louise Bourgeois (1911-2010) returned from hell like someone returning from a pleasure trip, full of ideas, motivated, rejuvenated ... "I've been to hell and I've come back... and let me tell you it was wonderful," is the title of a work by the artist dated in 1966, an embroidered handkerchief that talks about the balance and serves as a provocative title of the exhibition that has landed in the Picasso Museum in Malaga.

 
The exhibition, curated by Iris Müller-Westermann and organized by the Moderna Museet, covers seven decades of the career (and life) of the Franco-American artist through 101 works created between 1940 and 2009, one third of which have never been exposed before. The exhibition is arranged in thematic sections, following the symbolic and evocative Bourgeois's style with names like The Fugitive, Soledad, Trauma, Fragility, Relationships, Giving and receiving and Balance... Concepts that also highlight how deep and complicated their work was, always crossed by psychological states, emotions, sexuality, memory, human relations and identity. 
 
"Louise Bourgeois never differentiated between art and life," said at the press presentation Jerry Gorovoy, president of The Easton Foundation, an institution that manages the legacy of the artist ... For Bourgeois, art "was a healing art."
 
Louise Bourgeois was born into a wealthy and educated family  dedicated to the restoration of antique tapestries that moved to the US in the late 30s, where Louise developed her career as part of the American Abstract Artists Group.
 
Her work encompasses virtually all artistic disciplines, with sculpture as her favorite language: "The sculpture is the body, my body is sculpture," Bourgeois defended. In Malaga you can enjoy from her first wooden pieces from the 40s to her representations of the human body with fabric and metal. They are her big Spiders (... spider, mother, protective, weaver and patient ...) which will make it world famous. The critical acclaim and the market arrived late, she had already 71 years old, with the retrospective dedicated the MoMA in 1982, and Louise Bourgeois was recorded in the History of Art as the most important female artist of our time. It was the second woman who exhibited at MoMA, after Georgia O'Keeffe.
 

The Picasso Museum also shows the most intimate side of the artist, Louise Bourgeois: Photo Album, a room that traces the life of the artist in photographs and complete with the documentary `Louise Bourgeois: No Trespassing' of Nigel Finch for the BBC Channel.

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.