Mural by Jackson Pollock for the first time in Spain

 

It has nearly three meters high and six meters long, and it have the broken brushwork, the free stroke, dripping and the usual energy of the American painter. Mural was commissioned by the gallerist and collector Peggy Guggenheim who wanted in her living room a stunning piece to symbolize her support for the younger art. It was 1943 when Pollock gave her his finished work: "It's a stampede - said years later - Each animal in the American West, cows and horses and antelope and buffalo, all the load across the damn surface."

 

 

That energy contained between racks is the axis on which turns the exhibition "Mural. Jackson Pollock. The energy made visible ", curated by David Anfam, Senior Consulting Curator of Clyfford Still Museum in Denver (USA), and organized by the University of Iowa Museum of Art, a traveling exhibition will travel to Abstract Expressionism of the Royal Academy of Arts in London when leaving Malaga.

 

 

The exhibition brings together 41 works including a selection of paintings by Pollock and works of authors like Adolph Gottlieb, Roberto Matta, Robert Motherwell, David Smith, Charles Seliger, Andy Warhol, and the Spanish Antonio Saura and Juan Uslé. Among the works on display, also photography, with firms such as Herbert Matter and Barbara Morgan, that investigates the relationship between the work of Pollock and the so-called action photography.

 

 

With Mural, the Picasso Museum in Malaga works again on the effects of Picasso's work on later artists as they did with the work of Bill Viola (2010), Martin Kippenberger (2011), Richard Prince (2012) or Louise Bourgeois. Mural, as Pollock told many times, is the result of his admiration for the Mexican muralists and the enormous impression that the artist received the first time he saw Pablo Picasso's Guernica.

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.