Santiago Ydáñez and the heartbreaking beauty

 

 

El Jardín de las Delicias, 2017 (Al fondo)

 

 

Santiago Ydáñez studied Fine Art in Granada and for the last 14 years he has divided his time between Jaén and Berlin. He was born in 1969, in the town of Puente de Génave, Jaén. He was influenced by the contact with earth and the countryside, animals and hunting. These features will create his symbolic world: erothic or forbiden sensuality, huge and strident portraits, “dismemberments” as a type of vanitas, defiant animals close-ups, art history reinterpretation, etc. The axial line of his work rests on the basic, primitive feelings shared by both humans and animals.

 

 

Sin título 2014

 

 

The artist uses photography as source material. Taking it as an starting point, he firstly makes a quick charcoal sketch and then picks up his brushes. He paints swiftly and impulsively, applying energetic, grey and black strokes in a rapid brushwork. These pieces cause different emotions in viewers: pain, pleasure, ecstasy and nostalgia. The artist use different support surfaces: canvases, books or objects he picks up at markets.

 

 

Versión de la obra ¡…Y tenía corazón! / Anatomía del corazón de de Enrique Simonet

 

 

The exhibition features selected paintings from the last decade of his career. Among them, `El Jardín de las Delicias (2017)´, an enormous 315 x 1000 cm canvas, shows the face of a blonde girl whose melancholy gaze speaks of absence, versus the tranquil beauty of a lost paradise. It is a criticism of cultural and ethical decadence that brought Germany to Nazism.
His exploration of the philosophical links between original and copy can be seen in a version painted specifically for CAC Málaga of Enrique Simonet's work ¡… Y tenía corazón! / Anatomía del corazón (1890), now exhibited in the Museo de Málaga, that renders a doctor making an autopsy to a prostitute. Apart from these pieces, we can also find objects such as cutlery boxes, frames, a mirror and jewellery cases, on which he paints or draws the same motifs and characters that appear in his paintings.

 

 

Objeto intervenido

 

 

Ydáñez’s artwork can be admired until the 24th of September in Contemporary Art Centre Málaga, where can be also visited the permanent collection, several summer workshops or Danielle Van Zadelhoff exhibition, dutch photographer.

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.