Teresa Lanceta Middle Atlas tapestries in La Casa Encendida

 

 

The artist Teresa Lanceta (Barcelona, ??1951) grew - artistically - surrounded by the avant garde and the conceptual art of the 70s and felt that, among so much individuality and depth, lacked some attachment to the land, some sort of orality, some skin... She started weaving as an investigation in this original code that connects groups around the world and of all time, while allowing a creative and formal freedom without limits, connected with the traditions, with ecology, with crafts and a "collective way to create, beyond personal genius "stresses the artist herself.

 

 

 

 

It was in 1995 when she discovered nomadic women weavers of the Middle Atlas. "I was shocked. There I saw an extraordinary, quite creative and vivid language. I had spent many years weaving ... and suddenly I found genuine partners, "said Lanceta. "I believe in the absolute universality of art and these people and these techniques give meaning to my conception of artistic creation and transmission capacity of language," she adds.

 

 

 

Thus It was born "Adiós al Rombo", the exhibition that we can enjoy until September 18 at La Casa Encendida of Madrid, a collection of rugs, pillows, blankets, coats, ... tissues that in their silence speak of ancestral tradition of gatherings of women narrating the history of their people. Her approach to tissue focuses on the formal elements in what each tissue is original and own, its repeating patterns, its code; while each tissue speaks about stories, lived experience... The tapestries, explained in the text by the curator Nuria Enguita, "transcend their decorative purpose or its symbolic function: they are part of a lifestyle and ancestral knowledge, and as display for their ornamental and artistic power. "

 

 

 

 

"Adiós al Rombo" collected works of her two previous exhibitions and includes tapestries, paintings, drawings, text and a series of videos made from interviews with women in the region or family migrants in Spain. 

 

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.