A cultural cycle to reflect upon the history of LGTBIQ activism

 

 

Although nowadays talking about the LGTBIQ collective is usual and, fortunately, many social boundaries regarding the understanding, adapting and integration of the group have been overcome, the truth is that a large lack of awareness on the nature of the transgender problem does still exist. Actually, we no longer talk of LGTB, but of LGTBIQ, in order to include within this acronym a reality that is not new, but that only recently has started to be understood and attended by the society together.

 

 

 

 

The initiative puts together the work of activists, artists and researchers in a program that offers workshops, exhibitions, cinema, music and performances. But the cycle also wants to document the changes that happened in the collective awareness, the political treatment and the cultural construction in regard to this group since the democratic Transition. The goal is to go deeper into the visibility of the collective with a historic perspective to understand its diversity from a sociological and political dimension, and what has been its evolution in the past forty years.

 

 

 

 

The program was displayed in three main locations: the Centro Cultural Conde Duque, CentroCentro and Matadero Madrid. Fefa Vila Núñez was the artistic curator of the project, which is framed within the activity World Pride 2017 of the city council of Madrid.

Precisely during these days, the Cineteca of Matadero Madrid hosts the projection of the documentary “Talking back. Memorias transfeministas queer/cuir”. This work focuses on understanding this figure, which takes its name directly from English and has developed an evolved meaning beyond the pejorative idea of “weird” linked traditionally to homosexuality.

 

 

 

 

 

And until the 1st of October, the exhibition “Nuestro deseo es una revolución. Imágenes de la diversidad sexual en el Estado español (1977-2017)” will be open at CentroCentro. This project gathers images of the evolution of the LGTBIQ activism since the first claiming manifestation in favour of gays and lesbians rights in 1977.

 

Images are taken from the official site of Madrid City Council.

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.