DAVID SALLE IMPACTS AT CAC

Fishing, 1998 oil and acrylic on canvas and linen 64 x 96 inches. Art © David Salle / Licensed by Vaga, NY, NY. Reproduction without permission is prohibited.

 

David Salle (Norman, Oklahoma, 1952), he is a very eclectic American artist. He has experimented with various artistic currents. He is credited with glimpses of Neo-Expressionism, Simulationism, Bad Painting, or New Image Painting, but, Salle is more than all that. After beginning in a avant-garde art of mid-century, he put aside the avant-gardes and went his own way. The artist, decided to combine all his environment and capture it in his work, towards the end of the 70 begins to merge works and techniques in image and video. This will result in his style personal and defined.

 

One of his first jobs was in a pornographic magazine, from there comes all that eroticism and sensuality that impregnate his works. A man without coveralls and with a certain naive air, he is able to show the two sides of the coin. The ironic and self-critical style is appreciated through this game of overlapping images.

 

 

David Salle, Yellow Fellow, 2015. Oil, acrylic, silk-screen printing ink, wax and digital printing on linen. 78 "x 108". Courtesy of Skarstedt, Copyright David Salle, VAGA License

 

 

"Inspired by true-life events" has 32 paintings dating back to 1992. The exhibition is divided into two sections marked a more introspective and sober, Silver Paintings, which according to the artist are a "forced juxtaposition" show monochrome photographs with a Only members, embodied in a canvas. The other part, more colorful and vibrant, Late product paintings, show us a representation of pop culture elevated to maximum power, its references to the 50s and 60s transpose us into a more personal and almost unitary language.

 

 

David Salle, Silver 1, 2014. Pigment on linen. 84 "x 60". Courtesy of Skarstedt, Copyright David Salle, VAGA License

 

 

The set of pop images is a part of its essence as it coexisted with this popular aesthetic. It may sound strange that these two exhibitions are joined in the CAC, but they really are the perfect complement. The artist denied the idea that they were created to expose themselves together, but what is undoubtedly the magnificent articulation they form in the same context.

 

 

Photo of the exhibition

 

 

Large formats that suggest a lot of emotions are part of this imagery created by the artist. Mix of provocative elements, words, objects and of course culture are the keys to the success of this great exhibition that is about to end. The exhibition ends December 4 so do not miss this great opportunity to enjoy an art loaded with emotion and dynamism.

 

 

 

Among the specialised professional profiles that we find in the cultural sector, and more specifically, in the field of visual arts, one of the most recent occupations is that of the curator. The ‘80s put attention on the role of the artist, with its innovative character and the enhancement of its figure as an essential articulator of creative proposals, while the end of the century moved the interest towards the exhibition centres themselves and their work as custodians of current production and as spaces to accommodate all proposals. The change of millennium strongly introduced in this panorama the role of the curator. Perhaps together with a social identity crisis, perhaps with the complexity that contemporary projects are currently acquiring, the need for building, articulating and delving into artistic discourses became evident.

Although the functions entrusted to this profession are not entirely new, since previously they belonged to conservatives, critics or experts according to the themes, the role has gained solidity because it combines all these purposes while allowing the specialisation of other professionals in their fields of competence. Now, as some curators themselves point out, the genuine spirit of this figure, who was born to facilitate the understanding of the discourse, create narratives within a sometimes chaotic and scattered context, mediate between the works and the spectator and create bridges between contemporary art and society.

The art of our day raises a multitude of unknowns for the visitor who must face proposals many times away from the aesthetic standards, which gives way to uncertainty and confusion; but, in turn, these works employ a closer language, materials and even compositions detached from the sophistication and the technical display of yesteryear, something that, far from favouring proximity to the message, generates some distancing. What we have just described is part of the very essence of current art. The questioning of the formalist guidelines and the recourse to tangible elements that are more utilitarian than embellishing are the new criteria of creation, where, above all, the message to be conveyed stands out.

Likewise, another inherent characteristic of the work of our time is the artists' concern for more immediate themes, for social, political and economic issues that seek to create a narrative and conceptual revulsion, leaving behind the aesthetic priority or, rather, making of the message its own aesthetic. In this context, strange as it may seem, contemporary creation encounters a linguistic barrier hindering the viewer's understanding. And to this circumstance, the abundant current production is added, covering a wide range of themes that are nothing more than a transcript of our diverse and globalised society.

The curator helps to facilitate this understanding by articulating a coherent discourse that allows the grouping of related ideas to set up the message. This requires to have an in-depth knowledge of the current state of the art, the lines of work of the creators, the most recent aesthetic proposals and the real demands of society to bridge the dialogue and allow the approach to art. If art deals with the same issues that concern us all, how can we not share its postulates? Cultural mediation requires the work of the curators to open a small window for reflection and to enable a space for exchange and idea generation. We share the thought that José Guirao expressed in a recent interview: "The curator is someone who reveals something new, and it would be a mistake for curators to become managers."

Understood this way curator’s role, many institutions have joined the trend of creating specific calls for new professionals to give light to their proposals. Let us remember, as an example, the call "Unpublished" of La Casa Encendida, or "Curator wanted", of the Community of Madrid or the call of Curating of La Caixa.