"ELLAS CREAN" FESTIVAL

The Ellas Crean Festival takes place throughout the month of March and until April 7th. A proposal that combines dance, theatre, music, literature and visual arts in an attempt to reflect on the active and producer role of women in the cultural sector.

One week ago the International Women's Day was celebrated all over the world, and our country was an example of the ability to call one of the largest social mobilisations that wanted to question the pre-established gender roles and claim social equality which still is a historical debt.

“Óyeme con los ojos”. María Pagés Company

Around this milestone, many contributions have been generated from the world of the arts, among which "Ellas Crean" stands out. This festival is an initiative of the Institute for Women and Equal Opportunities and the Conde Duque Cultural Centre, which has had the collaboration of more than thirty institutions of the capital to build a solid program where women are the protagonists. The project obeys to a collective clamour that has been growing and increasing in adherents in recent years. According to the Minister of Culture of France "the cultural sector has the duty to be exemplary in terms of equality between men and women", and to this aim, the festival responds, which is now in its 14th edition.

Ana Dévora

From March 1st to April 7th, activities in all disciplines are concentrated and offer a wide range of possibilities for all tastes and trends. In addition to institutional support, the contributions of many national museums to the program stand out and help to enrich the exhibition content with samples that deal with the figure of relevant women and the role of women in the arts from different perspectives, both social and historical.

“Sin ellas no hay futuro” ©Patrick Farrell

In a more contemporary level, the proposals of plastic arts are completed with two photography exhibitions in Conde Duque: "Sur la route", by Ana Dévora, a landscape image that invites to meet again with nature, and "Sin ellas no hay futuro", which portrays the harsh reality that women suffer in contexts of humanitarian crisis, organized by Doctors Without Borders. In addition, the "Tres en suma" initiative, which celebrates its 7th anniversary within the festival, brings together exhibition, performance and poetry in the first two weeks of April.

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.