FOR YOU, INSTAGRAMMER

After the first days of celebration of the fourteenth edition of Art Madrid, we have been able to immerse ourselves in social media, especially in Instagram, to know which works are the most photographed. In this article, we show you the pieces that you can not miss when you come to visit Art Madrid'19.

José Ramón Lozano

Sin Título (VI), 2019

Acrylic on fabric

170 x 190cm

Undoubtedly, one of the most appealing works to visitors is that of the young José Ramón Lozano (BAT Gallery Alberto Cornejo). His very close-up female portraits are, looking directly at the viewer, equally seducing and intriguing him. A painter specialized in portraiture, Lozano affirms that through this genre "he can transmit more of his work to the spectators". His work is a perfect manifesto of the new possibilities that even today can characterize such a traditional discipline and genre, as well as being a clear example of the unlimited power of young creation. Likewise, in the same stand, are the works of the Slovak photographer Mária Švarbová and those of Lantomo, a great Italian artist passionate about Chinese culture, these are also featured on social media.

François Bel

Ringringring, 2018

Vidrio acrílico

40 x 14cm

Rafael Barrios

Tumble, 2018

Lacquered steel

57 x 45cm

Peter Anton

Raspberry-Lemon Ice Bar, 2017

Técnica Mixta

56 x 23cm

Naturally, the sculptures of François Bel (Galerie Barrou Planquart), known as "Big Bangs" are one of the most shared images on Instagram. This artist, interested in new realism, street art and pop culture, makes impressive encapsulations in synthetic glass of a decisive moment, but at the same time reflects some of the great icons of the contemporary world: the concern of time passage, self-centeredness or materialism. He shares the critical vision of the state of things with another of the most prominent artists on social media: Layziehound Coka (ODA Gallery), a South African artist who works from a very gestural figuration and who will be accompanying us throughout the celebration of Art Madrid.

Gerard Mas

Guardian, 2018

Madera de teka quemada y vidrio

103 x 27cm

Many attendees have photographed the works of the Galería Hispánica stand (Madrid-Mexico City), where you can find pieces by American, Italian and Spanish authors, such as Rafael Barrios, Peter Antono, Paul Rousso or Mr. Brainwash (Thierry Guetta). The same is happening at the 3 punts gallery stand, where the works by Samuel Salcedo, Gerard Mas, Alejandro Monge or Kiko Miyares stand out, this last one also being present in the space of the Gallery Arancha Osoro. The works by Collage Habana artists, Andy Llanes Bultó, Ernesto Rancaño, Roldán Lauzán Eiras y Daniel R. Collazo, have been photographed and shared on social media.

Carlo Borer

Cluster, 2011

Steel

45 x 65cm

Oliver Czarnetta

Spektrum, 2018

Resin

41 x 17cm

In the stand of Schmalfuss the works by Carlo Borer also stand out, abstract sculptures made of steel in which the spectators find an interesting game of reflections; likewise sculptures by Oliver Czarnetta, mysterious faces isolated with secrets inside. In the Robert Drees space, the most portrayed are the pieces in rubber by the South Korean Sun Rae Kim and paintings by the Spanish Pepa Salas. Also, within the proposal of the Bea Villamarín Gallery are works by Carlos Tárdez, Patricia Escutia and Mònica Subidé, whom we also find in the Yiri Arts gallery. We also highlight the works by Isabel Alonso Vega (Fucking Art Gallery), made from smoke and methacrylate, pieces that speak to viewers of "the intangible, of what is present but can hardly be seen, it is almost impossible to touch and much less to catch".

Alejandra Atarés

Jardin con fondo rosa, 2018

Óleo y acrílico sobre lino

150 x 150cm

Manuela Eichner

Bruja, 2018

Collage sobre madera

60 x 45cm

The One Project space, the program curated by Nerea Ubieto, is having great success on social media. Pieces by Nuria Mora (Gallery About Art), Virginia Rivas (DDR Art Gallery), Manuela Eichner (RV Culture and Art) or those by Alejandra Atarés (Víctor) Lope) are the most shared images by instagrammers. Finally, we are happy to see that Rubén Martín de Lucas's audio-visual installation that welcomes the audience at the entrance is one of the works that is being recorded and photographed the most. We hope that this small guide will help everyone who wants to keep and share what they have seen in Art Madrid'19!

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.