FRANCIS PICABIA FINALLY IN THE MoMA

Francis Picabia. Je revois en souvenir ma chère Udnie (I see again in memory my dear Udnie). 1914

 

 

Francis Picabia, Paris, 1879-1953. He was a versatile artist, who left a living testimony of more than 200 works. In his 74 years of life, the work he performed was at least varied. Its main characteristic was the freedom with which it expressed itself and expressed its impressions in different artistic disciplines. He never married any style and at the same time was the representative of many. His versatility and chameleon capacity, he was consecrated as the most versatile artist of the avant-garde, and finally the MoMA pays homage to this great deployment.

 

 

Dadaglobe Reconstructed

 

 

In the work of Picabia, it has always been defined as complex as a minimum. Due to the wide variety of styles he has been adopting over the years, he can not even divide his career in stages. It is not attributed its own brand, but at the same time has experimented with different aspects such as pointillism, impressionism, cubism, Dadaism, collage or even ballet, literature and cinema. This sample includes 125 paintings of different formats, 45 drawings, a film, interviews with the author, magazines and even the recital of some of his poems.

 

 

'The Spanish Revolution', by Francis Picabia, 1937

 

 

Friend of the great geniuses of the avant-garde, all the words that came out of their mouths were compliments to his work and personal interpretations of him. Anne Umland, the curator of the exhibition, focuses her hopes on this changing facet of the artist leaving the viewer with a wide range of possibilities when interpreting the works. He sees it as a liberation of our subconscious when it comes to reading the works of Picabia, not to limit an already fixed explanation but to dynamite the structures already preset and to support an anti-artistic feeling.

 

 

View of the exhibition

 

 

The great variety of the work has made possible this great exhibition that shows Picabia in all its splendor. The historical events did not stop his eagerness to continue creating and renewing himself. On the contrary, they were a challenge to achieve the balance between traveling geographically and different artistic styles.

 

 

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.