PICASSO AND THE MASTERS

In every training process, artists learn from the masters; they copy the techniques, styles and works of their predecessors until they mature their own creative personality. This evolution necessarily involves imitating, repeating and interpreting the most representative pieces of art history as references. From there, the particular identity of the artist builds up, which is sometimes supported by previous works to offer an updated reading. This has happened with Duchamp, Modigliani, Damien Hirst, Goya, Bacon ... and Picasso himself.

Pablo Picasso, “Meninas”, 1957

Picasso used to say that "great artists copy, geniuses steal". This master of the 20th century also wanted to reinterpret some of the most iconic works of the history of painting and to do so he has sought inspiration in major European museums, such as the Prado or the Louvre. With his work, the author from Malaga adapted to the new times of modernism based on the classics.

Pablo Picasso, "Jacqueline con sombrero de paja", 1962

The Círculo de Bellas Artes hosts the exhibition "Picasso and the Museum" in which it explores this facet so little studied by the painter. Much has been written about the origin of Cubism and the imprint of Picasso in the universal history of painting, however, his work has not always been analysed from the perspective of his great influences.

Pablo Picasso, “Hombre con gorguera”, 1962

Since Picasso visited the Prado when he was 13 years old, the impact of these great works, which so much impressed him, can be traced in many of his compositions. Ingres, Manet, Velázquez, Courbet, Zurbarán, Delacroix, Rembrandt ... have left a mark, not always evident, in the author's imagination. Sometimes hidden among the angles of his cubic figures or hidden among the strokes of his sketches ... the inspiration has a lot of homage and imitation.

The exhibition is open until May 16th and completes with a program of guided tours and children's activities designed to understand better this unexplored aspect of Picasso’s work.

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.