Punto gallery in Art Madrid\'15

Directed by Jose Antonio Agrait, the second generation of the Agrait family, PUNTO gallery takes hard its international interest and organizes exhibitions curating working for the constant renewal of artistic proposals by promoting emerging artists working closely with museums, galleries, public and private institutions. 
Artists participating in Art Madrid'15: Julio Le Parc, Carmen Calvo, Valerio Adami, Juan Genovés, Victor Vasarely, José María Labra, Equipo Realidad, Natividad Navalón and José María Yturralde.

Equipo Realidad (http://www.art-madrid.com/artista-participante-am15/equipo-realidad), formed by Joan Cardells and Jorge Ballester, was born in Valencia in 1966, in the context of the Franco developmentalism, and voluntarily was dissolved ten years later. Equipo Realidad joins the critical figuration, which develops a painting with strong political and appropriation of images from everyday reality and history of art. Through serial works, the team analyzed the social transformation of the sixties, marked by expanding technology, consumerism and takeoff mass media. Your making critical position, demystifying the consumer society, underlies the treatment of iconographic symbols through the values that always have a double and ironic reading evidenced in works like 86 misses in swimsuit.

Equipo Realidad said: "What interests us is not reality, but his image", and therefore, taken as reference for his works images from magazines, advertisements and catalogs. They have been defined as a "radical painters that while denying authorship postulate teamwork, social criticism and political commitment", which cost them an absence of critical and without it, they had great difficulty in selling their pictures. Currently the work of Reality Team arouses great interest for both collectors and gallery owners, due to historical and political values associated with it, the same that caused the dissolution of the team in 1976.
 
 
Jose Maria Yturralde. (Valencia, 1942. BA and PhD in Fine Arts from the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Academician of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Carlos de Valencia. Professor of Painting at the Faculty of Fine Arts in Valencia. In the mid-sixties went through a stage of experimentation in the "material informalism", from which evolved into geometric abstraction and the "Op Art" that characterizes him, in which the influences of Vasarely and the Italian specialists and constructivism are detected .
 
In 1966 he worked at the Museum of Spanish Abstract Art in Cuenca, founded by the painter Fernando Zobel. At this time he started working in monochrome with synthetic materials. In 1967 he was a founding member of the Prior Art Group, led by Aguilera Cerni, and began to make Kinetic Art; This interest in technology was accentuated by participating in seminars center Calculating the Complutense University of Madrid, who introduced him to work with computers.
In 1975 he moved to Massachusetts (USA) where he researched and taught at the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. In the eighties, after further the kinetic direction with his "flying structures", he returned to the plane with an attitude that, while remaining constructively rigorous, is more poetic, because of the interplay of colors and instability of the compositions . Currently he is director of the Painting Department of the Polytechnic University of Valencia.

 

Among the specialised professional profiles that we find in the cultural sector, and more specifically, in the field of visual arts, one of the most recent occupations is that of the curator. The ‘80s put attention on the role of the artist, with its innovative character and the enhancement of its figure as an essential articulator of creative proposals, while the end of the century moved the interest towards the exhibition centres themselves and their work as custodians of current production and as spaces to accommodate all proposals. The change of millennium strongly introduced in this panorama the role of the curator. Perhaps together with a social identity crisis, perhaps with the complexity that contemporary projects are currently acquiring, the need for building, articulating and delving into artistic discourses became evident.

Although the functions entrusted to this profession are not entirely new, since previously they belonged to conservatives, critics or experts according to the themes, the role has gained solidity because it combines all these purposes while allowing the specialisation of other professionals in their fields of competence. Now, as some curators themselves point out, the genuine spirit of this figure, who was born to facilitate the understanding of the discourse, create narratives within a sometimes chaotic and scattered context, mediate between the works and the spectator and create bridges between contemporary art and society.

The art of our day raises a multitude of unknowns for the visitor who must face proposals many times away from the aesthetic standards, which gives way to uncertainty and confusion; but, in turn, these works employ a closer language, materials and even compositions detached from the sophistication and the technical display of yesteryear, something that, far from favouring proximity to the message, generates some distancing. What we have just described is part of the very essence of current art. The questioning of the formalist guidelines and the recourse to tangible elements that are more utilitarian than embellishing are the new criteria of creation, where, above all, the message to be conveyed stands out.

Likewise, another inherent characteristic of the work of our time is the artists' concern for more immediate themes, for social, political and economic issues that seek to create a narrative and conceptual revulsion, leaving behind the aesthetic priority or, rather, making of the message its own aesthetic. In this context, strange as it may seem, contemporary creation encounters a linguistic barrier hindering the viewer's understanding. And to this circumstance, the abundant current production is added, covering a wide range of themes that are nothing more than a transcript of our diverse and globalised society.

The curator helps to facilitate this understanding by articulating a coherent discourse that allows the grouping of related ideas to set up the message. This requires to have an in-depth knowledge of the current state of the art, the lines of work of the creators, the most recent aesthetic proposals and the real demands of society to bridge the dialogue and allow the approach to art. If art deals with the same issues that concern us all, how can we not share its postulates? Cultural mediation requires the work of the curators to open a small window for reflection and to enable a space for exchange and idea generation. We share the thought that José Guirao expressed in a recent interview: "The curator is someone who reveals something new, and it would be a mistake for curators to become managers."

Understood this way curator’s role, many institutions have joined the trend of creating specific calls for new professionals to give light to their proposals. Let us remember, as an example, the call "Unpublished" of La Casa Encendida, or "Curator wanted", of the Community of Madrid or the call of Curating of La Caixa.