Susy Gómez and “The dance of life”

 

 

Susy Gómez, “The dance of life” 

 

 


Susy Gómez was born in Pollença (Mallorca) in 1964. She studied Fine Arts in Barcelona and it was there where she started her started career, with an exhibition in Miró Foundation, in 1993. In 1995, she took part in ‘Salon of 16´s’, an annual exhibition initiative that promoted the work of sixteen national and international artists. The artist has shown her work in and outside Spain. Her wide work is formed by drawings, paintings, sculptures, installations, photographs, videos and performances. It heads towards informalist sculpture, usually in big formats and built from found materials, that many times has participative or even therapeutic purpose. It has a main importance the place where the piece is going to be located.

 

 

 

Susy Gómez, “The dance of life”   

 

 


The title of the exhibition, previously shown in Museu d’Art Contemporani d’Eivissa (MACE), refers to a painting by Edward Munch, artist that she has always admired, because of the way he works on the inner world and represents the invisibility. Other artist that has influenced Susy Gómez, concerning her theater vision, is the norwegian writer Henrik Ibsen. The artist pursues the visitor participation by making him feel identified with not only his own but with others. She has been also influenced by alternative therapies, which she has studied for thirteen years. An example are family constellations, a therapy that works mainly from the unconscious and family relationships.

 

 

 

Susy Gómez, “The dance of life” 

 

 

 

Susy Gómez artwork shows its anger against occidental society, which erases the traces of the pass. The artist talks about ruin and what is disused. Her sculptures are made by materials that belong to collapsed houses from the beginning of the century, that cannot be used anymore. She saves them from disappearing into obscurity. The artist wants to approach the visitor to her universe, always being aware that he will be the one who interprets her artwork in his own manner. 

 

 

 

Susy Gómez, “The dance of life” 

 

 

 

Tabacalera of Lavapiés hosts the Susy Gómez´s scenographic world and her “dance of life”, in which visitors will be able to participate, until next 3rd of September.

 

 

 

 

The CEART opens this Thursday, November 14th in the room A an exhibition dedicated to this master of photography, which will be open to the public until February 9th. The show includes one of the artist's latest projects, focused on the hard work carried out by the miners of Serra Pelada, an open gold mine in the heart of Brazil where employees daily risked their lives.

Immigration, poverty, marginal life, slave labour, man's relationship with the land, the use of natural resources... are issues that have always fascinated Salgado. From the beginning of his career as a photographer, his work has opted to give visibility to the most disadvantaged groups and to create with his images a vivid and impressive visual story without fakes. With a raw black and white, this author's work transits between photo-reportage and naturalistic photography.

And the idea that permeates all his work is human dignity. Salgado portrays employees, miners and gatherers from a purely humanistic approach that wants to value their integrity, their strength and their resilience.

“If you photograph a human, so that he is not represented in a noble way, there is no reason to take the picture. That is my way of seeing things.”

Salgado entered this discipline long after completing his studies in economics between Brazil and the United States, and a doctorate in statistics in France. But in 1973 his life took a turn, and he decided to start his career as a photographer. He achieved to work at the Gamma Agency and Magnum Photos for more than 15 years until in 1994 he founded his own agency “Amazonas Imagen”.

With the “Gold” project, the photographer portrays a harsh reality that takes place in the Serra Pelada mine, a name given to a totally devastated and anarchically excavated mining enclave, the world's largest open-pit gold mine, through which more than 50,000 people have passed. In the heat of the legends about the mysterious “El Dorado”, the enthusiasm for this precious metal led to the development of strenuous exploitation practices for the workers and to originate tales of grief and glory, of human victory and defeat between the soil, the tunnels and the cargo baskets.

The CEART exhibition brings together Salgado's full portfolio in his characteristical black and white and large-format photographs that leave no one indifferent.